Dating advice and stories for teens

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’ And I would say, ‘I can’t ignore it—I’ll get in trouble.’ If I was hanging around with anyone else, he’d get mad and yell at me on the phone.” Her friends knew only that something had changed.

“I was seeing Sarah less and less,” recalls Jeremy Carlson, 18.

“It affects [girls’] academic lives, lowers their standards for relationships and puts them at great risk for unintended pregnancy and STDs.” No one knows what causes such behavior—theories range from violence in the home to alcohol and drug abuse; others suggest violence in movies and the Internet may play a role.

What is clear: Boy abusers and girl victims, without help, are likely to repeat those roles as adults. Every afternoon she would sit on the front lawn of her house in a suburb of Palo Alto, Calif., hoping to catch a moment with Joe as he walked home from practice.

“I woke up and he was hovering over me,” Sarah, now 18, recalls.Initially flattered, Sarah gradually grew uneasy with Joe’s possessiveness.“He never really straight out said he didn’t like my friends, but he made it clear I didn’t need anyone else.That night, Joe called to apologize; Sarah told him it was over.“I was scared,” she says, and her parents forbade her from seeing him again. “I tried to ignore him,” Sarah says, “but there he was on the phone and the Internet. “He was everything.” She began seeing him on the sly, once even crawling out of her bedroom window.

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